Lawyer dating defendant professor dating a student


(“Postdated Checks: An Old Problem with a New Solution in the Revised U. Other states have laws that similarly allow a judge or jury to presume that the defendant had the intent to defraud with a worthless check if certain facts are proven. For example, in Colorado, a conviction for writing a bad check for 0 or less (or two or more bad checks within a 60-day period that total less than 0) is punished as a Class 2 misdemeanor, a single check for (or two or more bad checks written totaling) 0 or more but less than

(“Postdated Checks: An Old Problem with a New Solution in the Revised U. Other states have laws that similarly allow a judge or jury to presume that the defendant had the intent to defraud with a worthless check if certain facts are proven. For example, in Colorado, a conviction for writing a bad check for $500 or less (or two or more bad checks within a 60-day period that total less than $500) is punished as a Class 2 misdemeanor, a single check for (or two or more bad checks written totaling) $500 or more but less than $1,000 is considered a Class 1 misdemeanor, and a single check (or two or more checks written within 60 days that total) over $1,000 is punished as a Class 6 felony.

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(“Postdated Checks: An Old Problem with a New Solution in the Revised U. Other states have laws that similarly allow a judge or jury to presume that the defendant had the intent to defraud with a worthless check if certain facts are proven. For example, in Colorado, a conviction for writing a bad check for $500 or less (or two or more bad checks within a 60-day period that total less than $500) is punished as a Class 2 misdemeanor, a single check for (or two or more bad checks written totaling) $500 or more but less than $1,000 is considered a Class 1 misdemeanor, and a single check (or two or more checks written within 60 days that total) over $1,000 is punished as a Class 6 felony.

,000 is considered a Class 1 misdemeanor, and a single check (or two or more checks written within 60 days that total) over

(“Postdated Checks: An Old Problem with a New Solution in the Revised U. Other states have laws that similarly allow a judge or jury to presume that the defendant had the intent to defraud with a worthless check if certain facts are proven. For example, in Colorado, a conviction for writing a bad check for $500 or less (or two or more bad checks within a 60-day period that total less than $500) is punished as a Class 2 misdemeanor, a single check for (or two or more bad checks written totaling) $500 or more but less than $1,000 is considered a Class 1 misdemeanor, and a single check (or two or more checks written within 60 days that total) over $1,000 is punished as a Class 6 felony.

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(“Postdated Checks: An Old Problem with a New Solution in the Revised U. Other states have laws that similarly allow a judge or jury to presume that the defendant had the intent to defraud with a worthless check if certain facts are proven. For example, in Colorado, a conviction for writing a bad check for $500 or less (or two or more bad checks within a 60-day period that total less than $500) is punished as a Class 2 misdemeanor, a single check for (or two or more bad checks written totaling) $500 or more but less than $1,000 is considered a Class 1 misdemeanor, and a single check (or two or more checks written within 60 days that total) over $1,000 is punished as a Class 6 felony.

,000 is punished as a Class 6 felony.

Thus, a lawyer related to another lawyer, e.g., as parent, child, sibling or spouse, ordinarily may not represent a client in a matter where that lawyer is representing another party, unless each client gives informed consent. There are no “implications” of the relationship: I take my duties to my client seriously, as do all of the opposing lawyers I know on a personal level.

The disqualification arising from a close family relationship is personal and ordinarily is not imputed to members of firms with whom the lawyers are associated. Notice that it generally refers to “the existence and implications of the relationship between the lawyers,” which would seem to speak broadly, but then limits itself with a description limited to close family members. I would never dream of limiting my advocacy to benefit a close friend, family member, or romantic interest, and I would be insulted and disappointed if any of them ever expected me to do so.

Indeed, as far as I’ve seen, the rule is construed narrowly, at least in terms of whether or not an ethical violation is found, but it is construed a bit more broadly in terms of whether the client is entitled to post-trial relief for undisclosed relationships. Then again, were I the client, I’d certainly like to know if the judge and the prosecutor were having an affair (though that apparently was just fine in Texas), and “disclosure (preferably in writing) of family and other relationships, however attenuated, is always the better course even in situations where it seemingly is not required by [the rules]” is perfectly good advice.

Whatever the rules require (the Bar advisory opinions I’ve seen usually worry about a real adverse financial interest due to marriage), you have the general duty to put the client first and foremost.

Checks for $500 or greater but less than $1,000 are considered Class E felonies, which carry up to six years in prison and a $3,000 fine, while the most serious felony designation, Class A, is reserved for checks of $250,000 or more.