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This Miami-born, Brooklyn-bred Grammy Award-winning writer turned artist has worked with some of the hottest in the game, including Lil Wayne.” “Smith’s defining moment came after being tapped by Lil Wayne to be a part of his most successful project to date, , which sold one million copies in its debut week, one of only three rap albums in history to ever achieve this feat.

With her spitfire sidekick and aspiring singer Betty Idol by her side, this dynamic duo will take the Atlanta scene by storm,” read the description of Smith.

The Lhamana were third gender people who were born biologically male, but dressed as women and performed traditionally female tasks, as well as serving an important role as mediator in the tribe. with Stevenson and several others, was introduced around town as “an Indian Princess” and met President Grover Cleveland. Joshua Gilbert, was the first documented trans man in the United States to undergo hysterectomy and gonadectomy, in order to live his life as a man.

Stevenson wrote about We'wha in her diary and her anthropological work; she did not realize until much later in their friendship that We'wha was not a cisgender female. Jennie June (born in 1874 as Earl Lind), a member of the Cercle Hermaphroditos, wrote The Autobiography of an Androgyne (1918) and The Female Impersonators (1922), memoirs that provide rare first-person testimony about the early-20th-century life of a transgender person. Following his transition, Hart told The Albany Daily Democrat that he was "happier since I made this change than I ever have been in my life, and I will continue this way as long as I live[...] I have never concealed anything regarding my [change] to men's clothing[...] I came home to show my friends that I am ashamed of nothing." Billy Tipton (born in 1914 as Dorothy Lucille Tipton) was a notable American jazz musician and bandleader who lived as a man in all aspects of his life from the 1940s until his death.

Stories about Tipton appeared in a variety of papers including tabloids such as the National Enquirer and Star, as well as more reputable papers such as New York Magazine and The Seattle Times. The 1950s and 1960s saw some of the first transgender organizations and publications, but law and medicine did not respond favorably to growing awareness of transgender people.